The American Soybean Association and DuPont Pioneer are seeking applicants for the 2014 Young Leader Program. Now in its 30th year, the ASA DuPont Young Leader program is recognized for its tradition of identifying and cultivating farmer leaders who are shaping not only the U.S. soybean industry but all of agriculture.

“The Young Leader Program has had a significant impact on the soybean industry,” said ASA President Danny Murphy, a soybean farmer from Canton, Miss.

   Check Current Soybean Futures Prices

“For three decades, ASA/DuPont Young Leaders have participated in training and developed peer networks that have enabled them to better serve and represent their national, state and local agricultural industry organizations. Additionally, the training has a ‘real-world’ factor, providing a significant impact on their business as well.”

An educational two-part training program, the 2014 class of ASA/DuPont Young Leaders will meet for the first time at Pioneer’s headquarters in Johnston, Iowa, Nov. 19-22, 2013. The program will continue Feb. 25-March 1, 2014, in San Antonio, with training held in conjunction with the annual Commodity Classic Convention and Trade Show.

The ASA/DuPont Young Leader program offers the opportunity for participants to strengthen and build upon their natural leadership skills, meet and learn from other young leaders from around the country and expand their agricultural knowledge.

Applications are being accepted online at www.SoyGrowers.com/dyl.

 

Ag news delivered daily to your inbox: Subscribe to Delta Farm Press Daily.

 

ASA, its 26 state affiliates, including the Grain Farmers of Ontario, and DuPont Pioneer will work together to identify the top producers as part of this program. One couple or individual per state will be chosen to participate.

Applications will be accepted until Oct. 1.

 

               You might also read:

No smoking gun found as cause of honeybee decline and dieoffs

Keith Morton - always looking for ways to do things better

Kevin Simpson: We just quietly do our own thing

Organization and technology crucial to manage 8500 acres

Don't bet your farm: Estate plan can help preserve assets