EU-grown rapeseed however passed with a 38 percent value. Since virtually all of the soybean oil processed from U.S. soybeans in the EU is used in biodiesel production, disqualification jeopardizes $1 billion in annual sales of soybeans to EU markets.

A study funded by the United Soybean Board (USB) used actual U.S. production and transportation data to show that U.S. soy biodiesel reduces greenhouse gas emission by up to 52 percent. This study has been shared with USDA, USTR and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and has been submitted to the EU’s Joint Research Centre for their consideration and approval.

“The RED also requires a ‘proof of sustainability’ certification that biofuel feedstocks were produced on farms that have not been converted from high carbon density lands, such as rain forests,” Wellman added. “This approach does not provide for acceptance of the existing U.S. approach to conservation and environmental sustainability that may well be of higher value than the RED requirements in attaining its objectives.”

“ASA is also concerned by the possibility that, unless a workable approach to the RED is found, it will establish a precedent for other countries imposing environmental and sustainability requirements on U.S. agriculture,” Wellman stated. “Germany’s current implementation of this Directive represents a process mandate for systems of production and marketing that act as undue and unjustified trade barriers to imports of U.S. products.”

ASA represents all U.S. soybean farmers on domestic and international issues of importance to the soybean industry. ASA’s advocacy efforts are made possible through the voluntary membership in ASA by over 21,000 farmers in 31 states where soybeans are grown.