Veneman discussed her trip to China and Japan during a press briefing with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Zoellick. The nation’s top two trade officials also called on Congress to complete work on Trade Promotion Authority.

In Nara, Japan, Veneman will meet with agricultural ministers from Australia, Canada, the European Union and Japan for the 5th Quint Agricultural Ministerial. Veneman and her counterparts will discuss a number of agriculture issues, including the ongoing Doha Round of the World Trade Organization negotiations.

“The Quint meetings present an opportunity to discuss the next round of the WTO negotiations and U.S. leadership to expand trade and level the playing field,” said Veneman. “Our goal is to continue to reduce and phase out all forms of export subsidies, substantially improve market access, and reduce trade-distorting domestic support that not only hurts American farmers, but hinders competition around the world.”

While in Japan, the Secretary will attend events to promote the export of U.S. beef and other products into the country. She will also lead a discussion on the importance of new technologies, including biotechnology opportunities, for global food and agriculture.

“Biotechnology in particular presents so many opportunities for our food and agriculture system,” said Veneman. “When you look at the benefits in terms of fighting hunger, medical advances, drought resistant crops, and helping the environment, it is important that we work to help educate consumers around the world about the advantages of biotechnology.”

On July 27, Veneman will travel to China, where she will meet with Chinese leaders to discuss U.S.-China agricultural trade relations, including China’s WTO obligations, expanded trade cooperation, biotechnology and scientific research and exchange. Veneman will also speak before the American Chamber of Commerce.

“Our meetings in China will focus on broadening bilateral cooperation in trade and the importance of China’s entrance into the WTO,” said Veneman. “Given China’s importance to U.S. food and agricultural exporters, we will continue discussions on trade compliance, the promotion of scientific research and biotechnology.”

The visits to China and Japan will mark Veneman’s first trip to both countries as U.S. Secretary of Agriculture. China is the fifth largest export market for U.S. agricultural products, valued at $2.2 billion last year. Japan is one of the world’s leading markets for U.S. food and farm products, purchasing more than $11 billion in American agricultural, fish and forestry products last year.

e-mail: WASHINGTON – Agriculture Secretary Ann M. Veneman will travel to Japan and China later this week for discussions on the agricultural trade issues that continue to best the three countries.

Veneman discussed her trip to China and Japan during a press briefing with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Zoellick. The nation’s top two trade officials also called on Congress to complete work on Trade Promotion Authority.

In Nara, Japan, Veneman will meet with agricultural ministers from Australia, Canada, the European Union and Japan for the 5th Quint Agricultural Ministerial. Veneman and her counterparts will discuss a number of agriculture issues, including the ongoing Doha Round of the World Trade Organization negotiations.

“The Quint meetings present an opportunity to discuss the next round of the WTO negotiations and U.S. leadership to expand trade and level the playing field,” said Veneman. “Our goal is to continue to reduce and phase out all forms of export subsidies, substantially improve market access, and reduce trade-distorting domestic support that not only hurts American farmers, but hinders competition around the world.”

While in Japan, the Secretary will attend events to promote the export of U.S. beef and other products into the country. She will also lead a discussion on the importance of new technologies, including biotechnology opportunities, for global food and agriculture.

“Biotechnology in particular presents so many opportunities for our food and agriculture system,” said Veneman. “When you look at the benefits in terms of fighting hunger, medical advances, drought resistant crops, and helping the environment, it is important that we work to help educate consumers around the world about the advantages of biotechnology.”

On July 27, Veneman will travel to China, where she will meet with Chinese leaders to discuss U.S.-China agricultural trade relations, including China’s WTO obligations, expanded trade cooperation, biotechnology and scientific research and exchange. Veneman will also speak before the American Chamber of Commerce.

“Our meetings in China will focus on broadening bilateral cooperation in trade and the importance of China’s entrance into the WTO,” said Veneman. “Given China’s importance to U.S. food and agricultural exporters, we will continue discussions on trade compliance, the promotion of scientific research and biotechnology.”

The visits to China and Japan will mark Veneman’s first trip to both countries as U.S. Secretary of Agriculture. China is the fifth largest export market for U.S. agricultural products, valued at $2.2 billion last year. Japan is one of the world’s leading markets for U.S. food and farm products, purchasing more than $11 billion in American agricultural, fish and forestry products last year.

e-mail: flaws@primediabusiness.com