Southeast Missouri farmers and agricultural advisors are invited to a field day Friday, July 24, to see the results of tools and techniques that may help save and even make them money.

Participants in the free event, Profitability through Nitrogen Efficiency,

will visit two research sites and hear from the researchers about ongoing studies and results.

Participants can attend the morning session on rice, 8:30 a.m., at the Missouri Rice Research Farm on Hwy J, approximately 8 miles west of Malden, Mo., and/or the afternoon session on cotton and corn at the Jim Stuever farm, 3 miles north and 3 miles west of Bernie, Mo., at 6846 County Road 731.

Certified Crop Advisor credits are pending.

During the morning session, researchers will share results of a three-year comparison of nitrogen stabilizer products on rice.

At 1 p.m., farmers will see how emerging technology can pinpoint their nitrogen applications to crop needs, so less fertilizer is wasted through volatilization and runoff.

“No one can afford to take many risks in this economy,” said Jim Stuever, a row crop farmer. “Using nitrogen stabilizers and on-the-go nitrogen sensing is like having a second crop insurance. We’ll show Missouri farmers how and when they can make this technology pay.

“We’ve saved about 35 pounds of nitrogen per acre through the use of the on-the-go nitrogen sensors with comparable yield,” said Stuever. “That kind of efficiency keeps money in my pocket.”

“Using nitrogen fertilizer efficiently is the key to maintaining productivity,” said Christa Jones, project director for the Conservation Technology Information Center.

The event includes lunch and door prizes.

Attendees are encouraged to wear their rice boots for the field tours. Participants will drive their own vehicles to the morning and afternoon sessions.

RSVP to reserve your free lunch by contacting David Dunn, University of Missouri Delta Center, at (573) 379-5431 or DunnD@missouri.edu.

Profitability Through Nitrogen Efficiency is offered through efforts of the Bootheel Nutrient Management Committee funded in part by agreement between the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Conservation Technology Information Center. The project is in conjunction with the Missouri Rice Research and Merchandising Council, the Conservation Technology Information Center, the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Bootheel Resource Conservation and Development and University of Missouri Cooperative Extension Service.