BASF announces Priaxor, Merivon fungicide registrations

• Priaxor is expected to provide unprecedented disease protection and post-infection disease control from some of the toughest fungal diseases in soybeans, as well as several other crops.

• Merivon will do the same in several pome and stone fruit crops, including apples, cherries and peaches.

Growers now have two powerful new tools to prevent and control a broad spectrum of crop diseases.

BASF has announced the full U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) registration of Priaxor fungicide and Merivon fungicide.

Priaxoris expected to provide unprecedented disease protection and post-infection disease control from some of the toughest fungal diseases in soybeans, as well as several other crops. Merivon will do the same in several pome and stone fruit crops, including apples, cherries and peaches.

“BASF is committed to developing new chemistries and innovative products to help growers be more successful,” said Paul Rea, vice-president, U.S. Crop Protection, BASF. “The discovery of our latest active ingredient, Xemium fungicide, is a testament to our promise to provide the tools to help growers get the most out of every acre.” 

Priaxoris a 2:1 pre-mix fungicide containing F500— the same active ingredient as Headline fungicide — and Xemium fungicide, a new active ingredient in the carboxamide family, providing a new mode of action in row crops. Merivon is a 1:1 pre-mix fungicide of F500 — an active ingredient in Pristine fungicide —and Xemium.


Three years of BASF in-field research showed superior disease control and Plant Health benefits, which lead to consistent yield improvements in soybeans. From 2009 through 2011, soybeans treated with Priaxor showed nearly 17 percent less severity of Septoria brown spot compared to untreated soybean acres.

In more than 75 trials conducted by BASF in 2010 and 2011, Priaxor-treated soybeans had higher yields than untreated acres 87 percent of the time. In comparison, the current leader in the soybean market, Headline, out-yielded untreated checks 83 percent of the time.

“Priaxor takes crop disease management to the next level, providing a new standard of soybean disease control to improve yield and maximize a grower’s return on investment,” said Nick Fassler, technical market manager, BASF. “Research has shown Priaxor to be the most consistent soybean fungicide available.”


Priaxoris also labeled for use in potatoes and tomatoes to control disease, leading to improved crop quality. Studies showed Priaxor controls some of the toughest diseases threatening these crops, effectively controlling powdery mildew and black mold in tomatoes, and early blight and black dot in potatoes.

Two 2011 trials in California and Florida showed a nearly 20 percent less incidence of early blight in tomatoes treated with Priaxor compared to untreated plants. Three 2011 trials in California, Wyoming and North Dakota found potatoes sprayed with Priaxor had a 2.9 percent severity of early blight compared to an untreated check, which showed an incidence of 22.2 percent severity.

Priaxorhas also shown effective disease control in corn, controlling several yield-robbing diseases including Northern and Southern corn leaf blight, gray leaf spot and common rust.


Merivonfungicide, the newest fungicide for pome and stone fruit crop growers, also received registration from the U.S. EPA. Merivon is a pre-mix composed of F500 — an active ingredient in Pristine fungicide — and Xemium.

Three years of BASF in-field research showed effective control of diseases that annually affect pome and stone fruits, resulting in more marketable fruits. Specialty crops are plagued by annual diseases including scab in apples, powdery mildew and leaf spot in cherries, and blossom blight, shot hole and powdery mildew in peaches. Merivon will provide a new level of control on these devastating diseases.

The most recent Merivon research, conducted in 2011, found that:



• Apples treated with Merivon showed no apple scab, compared to 27.2 percent disease incidence when left untreated.



• Treated apples also had only a 1.5 percent incidence of powdery mildew, compared to 86.8 percent disease incidence when left untreated.



• Peaches showed as much as a 50 percent reduction of blossom blight, shot hole and powdery mildew when treated with Merivon compared to untreated checks.



• Cherry orchards treated with Merivon showed excellent control of powdery mildew, leaf spot and Monilinia brown rot.

“Merivon fungicide will be an important tool that’s both reliable and successful in providing the protection specialty fruit crops need from damaging, yield-robbing diseases,” said Caren Schmidt, technical service representative, BASF. “Research has shown Merivon will be an effective way for growers to control diseases and produce more marketable fruit, leading to increased profitability.”

The new active ingredient Xemium fungicide, paired with the active ingredient in Headline fungicide, will also be available through Monsanto’s next generation Acceleron Seed Treatment Products for soybeans and cotton.

To learn more about Priaxor and Merivon fungicides and their value to growers, visit www.Planet-Xemium.basf.us.

For more information on BASF Crop Protection products, visit http://agproducts.basf.us.

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