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Conservation-minded soybean growers

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The American Soybean Association is looking for this year’s winners of its Conservation Legacy Awards program, which is open to all U.S. soybean farmers. The application deadline for the program is Sept. 30.

Are you a soybean grower who excels in environmentally friendly conservation practices?

The American Soybean Association is looking for this year’s winners of its Conservation Legacy Awards program, which is open to all U.S. soybean farmers. The application deadline for the program is Sept. 30.

We’re in the midst of harvest and time is in short supply, but if your farm management practices are environmentally friendly — reduced-tillage systems such as no-till, strip-till, minimum-till or other conservation practices — and profitable, make time to apply.

The awards are sponsored by Monsanto and Penton Media’s Corn & Soybean Digest magazine.

The program recognizes winners from three regions: Midwest, Northeast and South.

Last year’s regional winners were Josh Lloyd, Clay Center, Kans.; H. Grant Troop, Oxford, Pa.; and Malcolm Oatts, Hopkinsville, Ky. Lloyd was also the national winner.

Each regional winner of this year’s program will receive an expense-paid trip for two to Commodity Classic in Tampa, Fla., March 3-5, 2011, where the regional winners and national winner will be recognized at an ASA banquet.

The three winners will be featured in an issue of Corn & Soybean Digest magazine.

To learn more about the Conservation Legacy Awards program, its regions and to download an application online, go to http://www.soygrowers.com/clap.

For more information, contact ASA Project Manager, Byron Keelin at (314) 754-1355 or e-mail bkeelin@soy.org.

Have some good conservation ideas to share? Know a farmer who is doing an especially good job of protecting the environment?

Tell us about them in the comments section below.

Discuss this Blog Entry 1

Tim Gieseke (not verified)
on Sep 17, 2010
Conservation of farmland usually saves oil, toil and soil in the near term for the farmer and provides economic stability in the long-term for the nation and globe. It is the foundation of our bio-economy: food, fiber, feed and fuels. Since the dawn of our economic system these values have been excluded from the cost and benefit of doing business, so-called economic externalites. If my senses are right, it appears that the sun is now setting on that day, and tomorrow these will no longer be externalities, but included as economic good and services. Because these are essential components of a functioning economy, farmers will be compensated for them in some monetary or non-monetary manner. So my conservation idea is EcoCommerce 101 (www.ecocommerce101.com)

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