AccuWeather.com reports while crews race to contain the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, severe weather and a period of rough seas this weekend will threaten the area as a line of thunderstorms is forecast to move through the region.

Thunderstorms will sweep west to east through the area, bringing thunder, lightning and up to several inches of rain to the Deep South and Gulf of Mexico.

Winds can gust more than 60 mph with these storms. These winds, in turn, would kick up 5- to 15-foot waves, stirring up the ocean where the oil spill is spreading on the surface of the water.

If the 1-by-5 mile oil sheen escapes the containment area, further wave action and currents would spread the slick, possibly pulling it towards the Louisiana and Mississippi coastlines.

This scenario would have severe implications to wildlife near the shore, as well as the fishing and seafood industry in the general area, including oysters and shrimp.

According to The Associated Press, the U.S. Coast Guard reported that no new oil appeared to be leaking from the undersea well.

The Transocean Deepwater Horizon mobile oil rig exploded and sank about 50 miles off the coast of Venice, La. around 10:30 a.m., local time Tuesday morning. Eleven oil workers are still missing as of Friday morning.