Around 100 years ago, the agricultural economy of the Mid-South ran mostly on muscle, mule and steel. While it was a simpler time in many ways, a sense of urgency loomed as fall harvest approached. Each member of the community lent a hand — in the fields, at the gin, the store, the mill, etc. — to make sure the community had enough resources to survive the harsh environment of the early 1900s.

Green Frog, Tenn., located close to the intersection of Hwy. 412 and Hwy. 88 just north of Bells, Tenn., is a replica of one of those early Mid-South communities. Each fall, it holds its Cotton, Corn and Kids Family Fall Festival to celebrate the harvest of crops.

There are demonstrations on soap making, logging and plowing, cornbread cooking and sermons of the time.

Green Frog features an old cotton gin, the Cotton Museum of the South, an old print shop including a working linotype machine and press, blacksmith shop, gin store, log barns and cabins built by early settlers in Crockett County, a chapel from the 1800s featuring hand hewn log ceiling timbers and a steam sawmill being renovated.

The first attempt to start an old Fairbanks-Morse steam engine that once provided the power for early cotton gins, failed. However, mechanics weren't discouraged and continued to work on it throughout the day.