It's easy to see when crops are stressed, but it takes training to pinpoint the cause. The results of subsoil pest feeding and root rot, for example, look just about the same to the casual observer, even though the required remedies are worlds apart.

The University of Missouri Crop Injury Clinics, scheduled for July 22-23 and July 24-25, teach participants the subtle variations in plant injuries that will enable them to make correct diagnoses. The two-day clinics feature hands-on training in soil, water and nutrient management; crop production; identification of insect and herbicide injury; and how environmental conditions affect plant disease.

This year's sessions at MU Bradford Research and Extension Center near Columbia, Mo., also feature training in new technologies, said Bradford superintendent Tim Reinbott. For example, although many farmers are planting crops that are modified for resistance to herbicides or insects, relatively few producers are familiar with the science behind them.

“In a session called Biotechnology and Variety Development, we're going to have the students do hands-on DNA extraction and look at how biotechnology has been used to generate new lines,” Reinbott said. “People have heard a lot about biotechnology, but we need to get them more familiar with how it all works. This will give them a better understanding.”

The cost of each two-day clinic is $150 per person and includes instruction, reference materials, noon lunches, refreshment breaks and a dinner on the evening of the first day of the clinic. CEU credit has been applied for under the Certified Crop Advisor Program.

Registration is limited to 60 people per clinic, so early registration is encouraged. Pre-register on the Worldwide Web at https://agebbnet.missouri.edu/cidc/register.asp.

For more information about the content of the clinic sessions, contact Reinbott at 573-884-7945 or by e-mail at ReinbottT@missouri.edu. For registration information, contact Thresa Chism at 573-884-7945 or e-mail her at ChismT@missouri.edu.