As glyphosate-resistant pigweed races through Arkansas row-crops, producers are burning up Bob Scott’s phone line.

“They need help,” says the Arkansas Extension weed specialist. “Often, it’s a serious situation. Farmers are disking fields up. If pigweed gets 8 to 10 inches high, it’s pretty much a lost cause — you might as well start over.”

A field day set for June 29 on Sid Fogg’s Widener, Ark., farm will show producers what management options are available to combat resistant pigweeds in soybeans.

“Sid had a terrible pigweed problem in 2009,” said Scott. “He spent a lot of money and sweat trying to control glyphosate-resistant pigweed and still ended up with a grown-up mess. Roundup Ready beans, Roundup and the conventional products just didn’t work for him post-emerge.”

This year, Fogg is “on a residual program and we’re running all kinds of tests to see what will work in various situations around his operation. Extension is managing one of Sid’s 70-acre fields and he’s done everything we’ve asked him to. The 70 acres are half planted in LibertyLink beans and half in Roundup Ready.

“In addition, we’ve got about 10 acres in small research plots with many different treatments. The post-treatment applications just went out (the week of May 17).

“Basically, we’re working this like a model farm. There’s also a soybean verification field on the farm.”

This will all lend itself to a good field day, says Scott. “I know we’re always talking about resistant weeds. But it isn’t without reason — resistant pigweed is taking over.”

For more information about the field day, contact Mitch Crow, St. Francis County Extension Staff Chair, at (870) 261-1730 or e-mail mcrow@uaex.edu.

e-mail: dbennett@farmpress.com