Who will conduct the necessary research to find ways to reduce inputs needed to grow our food? Private industry has no economic incentive to reduce input costs, because it will deflate their bottom line. It is difficult to imagine a fertilizer company sponsoring research to reduce the reliance of our farmers on the very product the company sells.

It’s equally difficult to see the federal government, which supports competitive research to solve problems, willingly address some of these real-world issues. Federally funded research tends to focus on high-minded, long-term societal needs. This is certainly important and needed research, yet it doesn’t broadly address today’s agricultural problems.

It’s unlikely that federally sponsored research will help our farmers adjust to the new reality of extremely high input costs, at least in the short-term. And, the short-term is going to determine who remains in business.

Research to reduce input costs for food production falls squarely on our nation’s land-grant university system. The University of Georgia and Fort Valley State University are two of the premier land-grant universities in the country with a direct mandate to help our farmers stay in business and produce food for Georgia, the nation and the world.

The land-grant system in Georgia is fully capable of providing needed research to help reduce our farmers’ input costs. We can translate and transfer that information through Cooperative Extension to farming communities when and where it’s most needed. Supporting the land-grant mission of the University of Georgia and Fort Valley State University is more important now than ever.

As the world cries out for more food, we need to double world food production by the year 2050. Agriculture is Georgia’s largest industry with a strong infrastructure that is setting us well on the way to becoming the breadbasket of the world.

It is clear Georgia will play a major role in feeding the world.

With a deepened Port of Savannah and a widened Panama Canal, we are ideally situated to grow the food and reap the economic benefits this great industry can provide. However, we will only compete and be successful if we remain on the cutting edge of research, training of the next generation of students and transferring that information to the farming communities who implement these new practices.

(J. Scott Angle is dean and director of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.)