The farmer in me made me believe I was going to get the rain, so I didn't flush. They got a half-inch rain a mile down the road. I didn't get enough to melt the bird droppings in the rain gauge.

I am getting some early evaluations of my rice and soybean research plots. First, where I flushed just as the rice was spiking, both Command pre-emergence and Facet delayed pre-emergence treatments are performing just as they have in the past. This is under a carpet-level infestation of barnyardgrass and broadleaf signalgrass.

I have not kept them wet. In fact, I let it get dry to the point of the soil cracking before spraying my two- to three-leaf grass treatments. I faced the same “Do I flush and spray or spray and flush?” question farmers call me about.

Weather-related questions are the toughest. I am asked 20 to 50 times a day to help make management decisions over the telephone. Sometimes I think, “Boy, if you could just see me trying to make my own on-site management decisions, you probably wouldn't call.”

The farmer in me made me believe I was going to get the rain, so I didn't flush. They got a half-inch rain a mile down the road. I didn't get enough to melt the bird droppings in the rain gauge. I sprayed and flushed since I was using a tractor. Had I been using a plane, I would have flushed and sprayed.

I get a lot of calls about smartweed. I have a really good smartweed test this year on which we sprayed 4- to 5-inch, six- to eight-leaf smartweeds. As in the past, Storm was the standard for comparison. Another outstanding treatment was Aim. Both the Storm alone and Aim alone (both had crop oil) were near 100 percent.

A gallon of Super Wham alone, however, provided 80 to 90 percent control. Of course, Super Wham plus Storm or Aim was 100 percent.

The treatments were only out a week when I looked at them, so it was too early to tell much about the Permit and Londax treatments.

Small smartweeds are easy to kill and big ones are “job security for weed scientists.” Those we sprayed were right on the border of being too large.

I was particularly impressed with the Aim treatment; I have not been so impressed with it through the years in other situations because we have had trouble with the formulation. The formulation this year seems much better. We are also evaluating two new liquid formulations of Aim.

I still think the herbicide will “struggle” when applied alone. However, it will definitely add some “heat-em-up” to propanil for broadleaf weed control. Keep in mind, however, it will not control annual sedge (it is okay with propanil) or yellow nutsedge.

I will appreciate any feedback on how your Ricestar applications perform. We were definitely in the right place in the right year with the Section 18. Your feedback will help us coordinate what we are seeing in our plots with what is happening in the field.


Ford Baldwin is an Arkansas Extension weed scientist.
e-mail:
fbaldwin@uaex.edu