Paul Hollis

Paul
Hollis
Editor,
Southeast Farm Press

Paul Hollis is a native of Alabama who received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Auburn University. He served as business editor and city editor for a daily newspaper and as publications and news editor for the Alabama Cooperative Extension System before joining Farm Press in 1990. Paul lives with his wife Tammy in Auburn, Ala. They have a daughter, Tess.

Articles
FAA drone ruling said to be setback for farmers, research
A recent Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) ruling that governs the use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) or so-called drones in commercial agriculture is a setback for farmers and those whose research directly benefits farmers, says an Auburn University Extension specialist.
What fresh ground can do for peanut yields
Owen Yoder had an idea last year that his peanut crop was shaping up to be a good one, but he didn’t realize how good until he began harvesting.
soybean
Soybean prices are less likely to be connected to corn
While soybean prices have been following the corn market in recent years, they now seem ready to strike out on their own.“ Soybean prices have been following the corn market the last three years but are now poised to separate from corn,” says Todd Davis, senior economist with the American Farm Bureau Federation.
Corn harvest
Best of times: Everyone wants to be a corn producer — and buyers abound
It’s a good time to be a grain farmer, especially considering worldwide consumption, says Mark Welch, Texas A&M University economist. While some economists have made the argument recently that the bull market in corn might be reversing to a bear market, he says such predictions might be off the mark.
AUBURN UNIVERSITY EXTENSION Entomologist Tim Reed
Kudzu bug: Increasingly a pest in southern soybeans
While some Alabama farmers got a reprieve from kudzu bugs in 2013, almost everyone should expect to see the pest in 2014. “I think we have potential for kudzu bugs to be a statewide issue on soybeans,” says Tim Reed, Auburn University Extension entomologist.
Randy Dowdy
‘Be willing to try something new,’ says Southeast corn yield champ Randy Dowdy
Randy Dowdy believes strongly in the power of change, and it’s a philosophy that has served him well. A perennial national corn yield champ, the south Georgia farmer has produced yields that previously were not thought possible in the lower Southeast.
South Carolina’s James Cooley wins Sunbelt Expo Farmer of the Year Award
James Cooley of Chesnee, S.C., was named the 2013 Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year during the opening day of the Expo.
Farmer-friendly exemptions, credits illustrate the good government can do (Southeast Farm Press)
Let’s talk for a moment about a concept that has become foreign in the eyes of many today — good government. That’s right, good government, the kind that serves the taxpayer well.
Flood of peanuts expected from 2012’s bountiful U.S. crop (Southeast Farm Press)
One-thousand-dollar-per-ton prices, as good as they sounded at the time, might have been the worst thing to happen to the peanut industry, says Nathan Smith, University of Georgia Extension economist.
Don’t look to past for soybean pricing opportunities
Don’t let your rearview mirror be larger than your windshield. That might be the best advice possible going forward for soybean producers, especially considering prices during 2012, says Max Runge, Auburn University Extension economist.
Corn sitting firmly as king of crops
All predictions point to corn remaining king of crops at least for the foreseeable future, says Todd Davis, senior economist with the American Farm Bureau.
Florida’s Dale McClellan named Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year
Florida dairy farmer Dale McClellan was named the Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year during the opening day of the Expo, being held Oct. 16-18 in Moultrie, Ga.
Sunbelt Expo: improving irrigation efficiency, technology
Unbiased agricultural research depends on removing all variables in a given situation, including irrigation.
Control of resistant pigweed comes at a price
Georgia cotton producers are spending approximately $150 million per year to control glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth pigweed.
Vegetables: good supply, low prices
Warm weather and generally good growing conditions translate into large volumes of high-quality fresh commercial vegetables and continuing low prices for producers, according to the latest USDA Vegetables and Melons Outlook Report.
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